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how to help my weed plant grow faster

How to help my weed plant grow faster

Marijuana plants, just like every other plant, need nutrients and timing is everything. During the vegetative stage, use nutrients with a high level of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium (N, P, and K). A ratio of 3:1:2 of NPK is ideal.

1 – Add the Correct Nutrients at the Right Time

During the flowering stage, switch your focus to phosphorus. Aim for an NPK ratio of 1:3:1. A good option here is to mix wood ash with water as it contains a high phosphorus content.

2 – Achieving the Perfect pH

The sheer array of equipment available to cannabis growers means it should, in theory, be easy to produce a bountiful harvest. New technology means you can grow dozens of plants in a small area, assuming you have a commercial license. Otherwise, you need to get the most out of a handful of plants, or the time you invest will amount to very little.

How to help my weed plant grow faster

Cannabis buds will form at most of the plant’s nodes. A node is where a leaf or branch grows off the stalk. The larger the plant grows, the more nodes will appear, which means your plant will have more locations where buds can grow.

Pruning

Intuitively, you might think that more nodes means more and larger buds, but this is far from the truth. Nodes with buds that are lower down on the plant away from the canopy will try to develop in flowering but will never become fully developed because they do not receive adequate light.

Training

If you are a cannabis grower, you know the underlying goal is to grow the biggest and healthiest buds possible in your garden. You also know the feeling of disappointment when a strain you’re growing never fully develops the dense sticky buds you hope it would. While some strains are low-yielding, you should always be able to produce a high-quality bud if you’re taking the right steps.

How to help my weed plant grow faster

Grow light tips to produce excellent vegetative growth:

Even when plants have the same genetics and are grown in identical conditions, sometimes you end up with runts. That’s a natural part of growing and it may not be your fault.

Note: This article is about slow-growing seedlings and vegetative plants. If you’re in the flowering stage, check out these articles about buds taking forever to mature, increasing yields and improving bud density.

1.) Watering

If you’re seeing nutrient deficiencies, chances are your plant isn’t growing as fast as it could. This seedling is growing slowly due to an iron deficiency caused by high pH at the roots (it’s also overwatered, which isn’t helping).

Look at your plants for at least a minute or two every day. It’s really easy to overlook problems if you just water them and go. Taking a minute to really look at each plant and its leaves will often reveal problems right as they’re starting.

Most growers can’t choose the exact temperature down to the degree, so here’s a more realistic temperature chart.

5.) Bugs or Other Pests

Cold temperatures can also stunt plants or make them grow at a snail’s pace. This plant experienced a cold night under 50°F/10°C and was droopy the next morning. It took several days for the plant to recover and start growing normally again. To make things worse, cold temperatures cause plants to drink less, so they’re more likely to suffer from symptoms of overwatering when the temperature falls.

Overwatering is most common when you have a small plant in a big pot because the roots aren’t drinking much yet. Luckily, this can be overcome with proper seedling watering practices. Yet even if you’re watering plants perfectly, a poor draining grow medium (such as thick muddy soil, or a pot without drainage holes) will still trigger root problems and slow growth due to lack of oxygen at the roots.